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  • Rambler (automobile)

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    Rambler logo, 1960sRambler was an automobile brand name used by the Thomas B. Jeffery Company between 1900 and 1914, then by its successor, Nash Motors from 1950 to 1954, and finally by Nash's successor, American Motors Corporation from 1954 to 1969 in the United States and 1983 in international markets. It was often nicknamed the "Kenosha Cadillac" after its place of manufacture.

  • American Motors Corporation

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    American Motors Corporation (AMC) was an American automobile company formed by the 1954 merger of Nash-Kelvinator Corporation and Hudson Motor Car Company. At the time, it was the largest corporate merger in U.S. history. AMC went on to compete with the US Big Three—Ford, General Motors and Chrysler—with its small cars including the Rambler American, Hornet, Gremlin and Pacer; muscle cars including the Marlin, AMX and Javelin; and early four-wheel-drive variants of the Eagle, U.S. first true crossover. The company was known as "a small company deft enough to exploit special market segments left untended by the giants", and was widely known for the design work of chief stylist, Dick Teague, who "had to make do with a much tighter budget than his counterparts at Detroit's Big Three" but "had a knack for making the most of his employer's investment". After periods of intermittent but unsustained success, Renault acquired a major interest in AMC in 1979—and the company was ultimately acquired by Chrysler. At its 1987 demise, The New York Times said AMC was "never a company with the power or the cost structure to compete confidently at home or abroad."

  • Rambler Classic

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    The Rambler Classic is an intermediate sized automobile that was built and sold by American Motors Corporation (AMC) from the 1961 to 1966 model years. The Classic took the place of the Rambler Six and Rambler Rebel V-8 names, which were retired at the end of the 1960 model year. Introduced at first as only a six-passenger four-door sedan and station wagon versions, additional body styles were added with two-door models available as a "post" sedan and in 1964 as a sporty pillar-less hardtop, as well as a convertible for 1965 and 1966.Motor Trend magazine selected AMC's Classic line as Car of the Year award for 1963. The Rambler Rebel name replaced Classic on AMC's completely redesigned large-line of cars in 1967, and for 1968 the Rebel was renamed the AMC Rebel as AMC began the process of phasing out the Rambler marque. Throughout its life in the AMC model line-up, the Classic was the high-volume seller for the independent automaker.

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