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  • Telephone numbers in the Republic of Ireland

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    Numbers on the Irish Telephone Numbering Plan are regulated and assigned to operators by ComReg.

  • Reverse telephone directory

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    A reverse telephone directory (also known as a gray pages directory, criss-cross directory or reverse phone lookup) is a collection of telephone numbers and associated customer details. However, unlike a standard telephone directory, where the user uses customer's details (such as name and address) in order to retrieve the telephone number of that person or business, a reverse telephone directory allows users to search by a telephone service number in order to retrieve the customer details for that service. Reverse telephone directories are used by law enforcement and other emergency services in order to determine the origin of any request for assistance, however these systems include both publicly accessible (listed) and private (unlisted) services. As such, these directories are restricted to internal use only. Some forms of city directories provide this form of lookup for listed services by phone number, along with address cross-referencing. Publicly accessible reverse telephone directories may be provided as part of the standard directory services from the telecommunications carrier in some countries.

  • Telephone directory

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    A "white pages" telephone directory A telephone directory, also known as a telephone book, telephone address book, phone book, or the white/yellow pages, is a listing of telephone subscribers in a geographical area or subscribers to services provided by the organization that publishes the directory. Its purpose is to allow the telephone number of a subscriber identified by name and address to be found. The advent of the Internet and smartphones in the 21st century greatly reduced the need for a paper phone book. Some communities, such as Seattle and San Francisco, sought to ban their unsolicited distribution as wasteful, unwanted and harmful to the environment.

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