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  • Homasote

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    Homasote is a brand name associated with the product generically known as cellulose based fiber wall board, which is similar in composition to papier-mâché, made from recycled paper that is compressed under high temperature and pressure and held together with an adhesive. It is thick and comes in sheets . The Homasote Company operates a factory in the West Trenton section of Ewing Township, New Jersey.

  • Hardboard

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    A section of hardboard Hardboard output in 2005 HardboardHardboard, also called high-density fiberboard (HDF), is a type of fiberboard, which is an engineered wood product. It is similar to particle board and medium-density fiberboard, but is denser and much stronger and harder because it is made out of exploded wood fibers that have been highly compressed. Consequently, the density of hardboard is 31 lbs or more per cubic foot (500 kg/m³) and is usually about 50-65 lbs per cubic foot (800–1040 kg/m³). It differs from particle board in that the bonding of the wood fibers requires no additional materials, although resin is often added. Unlike particle board, it will not split or crack. Hardboard has long been used in furniture, but it is also popular for use in the construction industry and with trades as a temporary floor protector. Hardboard has become less popular over recent years due to new environmental targets in the construction industry to procure more sustainable temporary protection materials. Hardboard is produced in either a wet or dry process.

  • Plywood

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    Softwood plywood made from sprucePlywood is a material manufactured from thin layers or "plies" of wood veneer that are glued together with adjacent layers having their wood grain rotated up to 90 degrees to one another. It is an engineered wood from the family of manufactured boards which includes medium-density fibreboard (MDF) and particle board (chipboard). All plywoods bind resin and wood fibre sheets (cellulose cells are long, strong and thin) to form a composite material. This alternation of the grain is called cross-graining and has several important benefits: it reduces the tendency of wood to split when nailed in at the edges; it reduces expansion and shrinkage, providing improved dimensional stability; and it makes the strength of the panel consistent across all directions. There is usually an odd number of plies, so that the sheet is balanced—this reduces warping. Because plywood is bonded with grains running against one another and with an odd number of composite parts, it has high stiffness perpendicular to the grain direction of the surface ply. Smaller, thinner, and lower-quality plywoods may only have their plies (layers) arranged at right angles to each other.

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