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  • Slang terms for money

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    Slang terms for money often derive from the appearance and features of banknotes or coins, their values, historical associations or the units of currency concerned. Within a single language community some of the slang terms vary across social, ethnic, economic, and geographic strata, but others have become the dominant way of referring to the currency and are regarded as mainstream, acceptable language (e.g., "buck" for a dollar or similar currency in various nations including Australia, Canada, New Zealand, South Africa, Nigeria and the United States).

  • United States one-dollar bill

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    The United States one-dollar bill ($1) is a denomination of United States currency. An image of the first U.S. President (1789–97), George Washington, based on a painting by Gilbert Stuart, is currently featured on the obverse (front), and the Great Seal of the United States is featured on the reverse (back). The one-dollar bill has the oldest overall design of all U.S. currency currently being produced (The current two-dollar bill obverse design dates from 1928, while the reverse appeared in 1976). The obverse design of the dollar bill seen today debuted in 1963 (the reverse in 1935) when it was first issued as a Federal Reserve Note (previously, one dollar bills were Silver Certificates). The inclusion of the motto, "In God We Trust," on all currency was required by law in 1955, and first appeared on paper money in 1957. An individual dollar bill is also less formally known as a one, a single, a bone, and a bill. The Federal Reserve says the average life of a $1 bill in circulation is 5.8 years before it is replaced because of wear. Approximately 42% of all U.S. currency produced in 2009 were one-dollar bills.

  • United States two-dollar bill

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    The United States two-dollar bill ($2) is a current denomination of U.S. currency. The portrait of the third President of the United States (1801–09), Thomas Jefferson, is featured on the obverse of the note. The reverse features an engraving of the painting Declaration of Independence by John Trumbull. Throughout the $2 bill's pre-1929 life as a large-sized note, it was issued as a United States Note, National Bank Note, silver certificate, Treasury or "Coin" Note and Federal Reserve Bank Note. When U.S. currency was changed to its current size, the $2 bill was issued only as a United States Note. Production went on until 1966, when the series was discontinued. Ten years passed before the $2 bill was reissued as a Federal Reserve Note with a new reverse design. Two-dollar bills are seldom seen in circulation as a result of banking policies with businesses which has resulted in low production numbers due to lack of demand. This comparative scarcity in circulation, coupled with a lack of public knowledge that the bill is still in production and circulation, has also inspired urban legends about its authenticity and value and has occasionally created problems for those trying to use the bill to make purchases.

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