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  • Fascinator

    serch.it?q=Fascinator

    Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, wearing a red fascinator during her visit to Canada in 2011 A fascinator is a headpiece, a style of millinery. Fascinators were originally a form of lightweight knitted head-covering. Since the 1990s the term refers to a type of formal headwear worn as an alternative to the hat; it is usually a large decorative design attached to a band or clip, sometimes incorporating a base to resemble a hat, in which case it may be called a hatinator.

  • List of headgear

    serch.it?q=List-of-headgear

    This is an incomplete list of headgear (that is, anything worn on the head), both modern and historical. Herakles wearing a hat. Ancient Greek Attic black-figure olpe, 550–530 BC. Louvre Museum, Paris.

  • Top hat

    serch.it?q=Top-hat

    The King of the Belgians and the Royal family with Queen Victoria ca. 1859 Austin Lane Crothers, 46th Governor of Maryland (1908–1912), wearing a top hat A top hat, beaver hat, high hat, silk hat, cylinder hat, chimney pot hat or stove pipe hat, sometimes also known by the nickname "topper", is a tall, flat-crowned, broad-brimmed hat, worn by men from the latter part of the 18th to the middle of the 20th century. By the end of World War II, it had become a rarity in ordinary dress, though it continued to be worn in specific instances, such as state funerals, also by those occupying prominent positions in the Bank of England, by certain City stock exchange officials and occasionally when passing between the Law Courts and Lincoln's Inn, London by judges of the Chancery Division and Queen's Counsel. , top hats are still worn at some society events in the UK, notably at church weddings and racing meetings attended by members of the royal family, such as Royal Ascot. They remain part of the formal uniform of certain British institutions, such as the boy-choristers of King's College Choir.

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