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  • Probability of precipitation

    serch.it?q=Probability-of-precipitation

    A probability of precipitation (POP), also referred to as chance of precipitation or chance of rain, is a measure of the probability that at least some minimum quantity of precipitation will occur within a specified forecast period and location. It is often published with weather forecasts.

  • Climate of Los Angeles

    serch.it?q=Climate-of-Los-Angeles

    Downtown Los Angeles on a typically sunny day, but with unusual atmospheric clarity. The Climate of Los Angeles is a year-round mild-to-hot and mostly dry climate for the LA metropolitan area in California. The climate is classified as a Mediterranean climate, which is a type of dry subtropical climate. It is characterized by seasonal changes in rainfall—with a dry summer and a winter rainy season. Under the modified Köppen climate classification, the coastal areas are classified as Csb, and the inland areas as Csa. The Los Angeles area contains microclimates, where daytime temperatures can vary as much as between inland areas such as the San Fernando Valley or San Gabriel Valley, and the coastal Los Angeles Basin.

  • Climate of Ireland

    serch.it?q=Climate-of-Ireland

    A typical North Atlantic low-pressure area moving across Ireland Köppen climate types in Ireland The climate of Ireland is mild, moist and changeable with abundant rainfall and a lack of temperature extremes. Ireland's climate is defined as a temperate oceanic climate, or Cfb on the Köppen climate classification system, a classification it shares with most of northwest Europe. The country receives generally cool summers and mild winters. It is considerably warmer than other areas on its latitude, because it lies in the northeastern Atlantic Ocean, and as a result is warmed by the North Atlantic Current all year. As a small island downwind of a large ocean, the climate of Ireland is profoundly impacted by that ocean. The Atlantic overturning circulation, which includes ocean currents such as the North Atlantic Current, moves heat northwards, which is then carried by the prevailing winds towards Ireland. The prevailing wind blows from the southwest, breaking on the high mountains of the west coast.

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