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  • Objects in mirror are closer than they appear

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    Indian-specification vehicle's side-view mirror with the eponymous legend Wing mirror on a South Korean-specification vehicle. Legend in Korean reads "Objects in mirror are closer than they appear". The phrase "objects in (the) mirror are closer than they appear" is a safety warning that is required to be engraved on passenger side mirrors of motor vehicles in the United States, Canada, Nepal, India, and Saudi Arabia. It is present because while these mirrors' convexity gives them a useful field of view, it also makes objects appear smaller. Since smaller-appearing objects seem farther away than they actually are, a driver might make a maneuver such as a lane change assuming an adjacent vehicle is a safe distance behind, when in fact it is quite a bit closer. The warning serves as a reminder to the driver of this potential problem. Comparison of the real over-the-shoulder view (green arrow) and apparent through the passenger side mirror (sum of red arrows) evaluation of distance between the driver's head and the object behind.

  • Fuzzy dice

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    A pair of fuzzy diceFuzzy dice, also known as fluffy dice or soft dice, are an automotive decoration consisting of two oversized (usually six-sided) plush dice which hang from the rear-view mirror. The original fuzzy dice, first used in the 1950s, were white and approximately across. Nowadays, fuzzy dice come in many colors (including fluorescents, with bright pink or blue being popular) and various sizes. In Britain and other parts of the world it is considered kitsch to display such items in a car.

  • Rear-view mirror

    serch.it?q=Rear-view-mirror

    Rear-view mirror showing cars parked behind the vehicle containing the mirror A rear-view mirror (or rearview mirror) is a mirror in automobiles and other vehicles, designed to allow the driver to see rearward through the vehicle's rear window (rear windshield). In cars, the rear-view mirror is usually affixed to the top of the windshield on a double-swivel mount allowing it to be adjusted to suit the height and viewing angle of any driver and to swing harmlessly out of the way if impacted by a vehicle occupant in a collision. The rear-view mirror is augmented by one or more side-view mirrors, which serve as the only rear-vision mirrors on motorcycles and bicycles.

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