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  • Superman and Lois Lane

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    Superman and Lois Lane are among the best known fictional couples. They were the very first superhero comic book romance. Created by writer Jerry Siegel and artist Joe Shuster, both characters (including Superman's alter ego, Clark Kent) first appeared in DC Comics' Action Comics #1 (June 1938). They have remained in a complicated relationship ever since. The couple has been portrayed in multiple Superman adaptations in different media. The characters' relationship was based for a long time in a love triangle in which Clark was interested in Lois who was smitten with the superhero Superman. Clark, unable to reveal to Lois that his mild-mannered demeanor was a ruse, was unable to compete for Lois' affection. The irony being he was his own rival in that Clark and Superman are, in fact, the same person. This love triangle and the dual identity were originally conceived in 1934. Following John Byrne's 1986 reboot, The Man of Steel, Clark's character became not only the more dominant personality of the Clark Kent/Superman character but also more outgoing, aggressive, and assertive. This allowed a more natural romance to develop between Lois and Clark. In the 1990s, Clark proposes marriage to Lois and reveals his identity as Superman to her. They began a long engagement, which was complicated by the death of Superman, a breakup, and several other problems. The couple finally married in Superman: The Wedding Album (Dec. 1996). Clark and Lois' biological child in DC Comics canon was born in Convergence: Superman #2 (July 2015), a son named Jonathan Samuel Kent, who eventually becomes Superboy. Lois appears in virtually every Superman comics and media adaptations. She is the character most commonly associated with Superman and continues to be an essential part of the Superman mythos. Across decades of comics and other media adaptations, in some stories, Lois knows or suspects that Clark is Superman, sometimes this is explored for humor or plot development.

  • Doom Patrol

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    The Doom Patrol is a superhero team appearing in publications from DC Comics. The original Doom Patrol first appeared in My Greatest Adventure #80 (June 1963), and were created by writers Arnold Drake and Bob Haney, and artist Bruno Premiani. The Doom Patrol has since appeared in multiple incarnations. The first Doom Patrol consisted of super-powered misfits, whose "gifts" caused them alienation and trauma. Dubbed the "World's Strangest Heroes" (an epithet conceived by editor Murray Boltinoff) the original team included The Chief (Niles Caulder), Robotman (Cliff Steele), Elasti-Girl (Rita Farr), and Negative Man (Larry Trainor). The team remained the featured characters of My Greatest Adventure, which was soon retitled Doom Patrol from issue #86 (March 1964) onwards. The original series was canceled in 1968, when Drake killed the team off in the final issue, Doom Patrol #121 (September–October 1968). Since then, there have been six Doom Patrol series, with Robotman as the only character to appear in all of them.

  • Rosamund Pike

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    Rosamund Mary Ellen Pike (born 27 January 1979) is an English actress who began her acting career by appearing in stage productions such as Romeo and Juliet and Skylight. After her screen debut in the television film A Rather English Marriage (1998) and television roles in Wives and Daughters (1999) and Love in a Cold Climate (2001), she received international recognition for her film debut as Bond girl Miranda Frost in Die Another Day (2002), for which she received the Empire Award for Best Newcomer. Following her breakthrough, she won the BIFA Award for Best Supporting Actress for The Libertine (2004) and portrayed Jane Bennet in Pride & Prejudice (2005). Pike had film appearances in the sci-fi film Doom (2005), the crime-mystery thriller film Fracture (2007), the drama film Fugitive Pieces (2007), the coming-of-age drama An Education (2009), for which she was nominated for the London Film Critics Circle Award for British Supporting Actress of the Year, and sci-fi comedy The World's End (2013). She also received British Independent Film Award nominations for An Education, Made in Dagenham (2010), and was nominated for a Genie Award for Barney's Version (2010).

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