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  • EMD BL20-2

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    The EMD BL20-2 is a road switcher diesel-electric locomotive that was introduced in order for EMD to gain entry to the rebuild market for the second time. Nearly a decade after production of the GP15-1 ceased, EMD revived the BL series in an attempt to crack the rebuild market and compete with GE's Super 7 series. All three BL20-2 demonstrators, road numbers 120-122, were built on the frames of ex-Burlington Northern GP9s of Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, Northern Pacific and Spokane, Portland & Seattle heritage. All three demonstrators were outshopped from La Grange in mid-1992. They bore no resemblance to the pre-GP series EMD BL1 and BL2 models of the late 1940s. Neither did they resemble GP9s, at least not from the frame up. On the inside, the unit married the technology of two generations, with a rebuilt 16-567C engine crankcase with 645 power assemblies. An EMD turbocharger was applied in place of the normal Roots blower, but it did not have a clutch assembly. It could not free wheel as a normal EMD turbocharger does. It was coupled to the engine gear train over the entire throttle range. The combination of the "turbo blower", 645 power assemblies and an increase in engine speed to 900 rpm boosted the output from mated to an AR10 alternator and Dash 2 electrical system. Although the GP9 frame, trucks, traction motors, fans and prime mover were rebuilt and reused, the locomotive received an all-new cab and carbody, basically that of a standard second-generation GP. Still, the unit had an unmistakable appearance, due to the absence of inertial air intakes behind the engineer's side of the cab, and the use of a squared-off dynamic brake assembly similar to that of a GP60. Competing in one of the toughest fields in the locomotive business, the three BL20-2s demonstrated for two years, but won no orders. They were redeployed to EMD's lease fleet in 1994, and have worked for several shortline railroads since then.

  • Basler BT-67

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    The Basler BT-67 is a utility aircraft produced by Basler Turbo Conversions of Oshkosh, Wisconsin. It is a remanufactured and modified Douglas DC-3; the modifications designed to significantly extend the DC-3's serviceable lifetime. The conversion includes fitting the airframe with new Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A-67R turboprop engines, lengthening the fuselage, strengthening the airframe, upgrading the avionics, and making modifications to the wings' leading edges and wing tips. Due to the slightly higher fuel consumption of the turbine engines of the BT-67, compared to the original piston designs fitted to the standard DC-3, range on the standard fuel tank, with 45 minute reserve, is reduced from . Basler provides a long-range fuel tank which increases the aircraft range to .

  • EMD SD24

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    The EMD SD24 was a six-axle (C-C) road switcher diesel-electric locomotive built by General Motors' Electro-Motive Division of La Grange, Illinois between July 1958 and March 1963. A total of 224 units were built for customers in the United States, comprising 179 regular, cab-equipped locomotives and 45 cabless B units. The latter were built solely for the Union Pacific Railroad. The SD24 was the first EMD production locomotive to be built with an EMD turbocharged diesel engine. The first SD24 was built sixteen months before the four-axle (B-B) model GP20. Power output of the SD24 was 33 percent higher than the of the concurrent Roots blower-equipped SD18s with the same engine displacement. The SD24 had per axle, limited by the traction motors then available. Nevertheless, the turbocharged SD24 provided full rated power at all altitudes, which the Roots-blown SD18 could not provide. In terms of sales, the SD24 was only a moderate success, and had average service lives in SD24 configuration (though a few deturbocharged rebuilds are still in operation), but the SD24 was a milestone in EMD locomotive development and the forerunner to today's high-powered six-axle locomotives.

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