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  • Popcorn ceiling

    serch.it?q=Popcorn-ceiling

    Popcorn ceiling texture close up A popcorn ceiling (slang), also known as a cottage cheese ceiling, a stucco ceiling or formally an acoustic ceiling, is a ceiling with a certain spray-on or paint-on treatment. It was the standard for bedroom and residential hallway ceilings for its bright, white appearance, ability to hide imperfections, and acoustical characteristics. In comparison, kitchen and living room ceilings would normally be finished in smoother skip-trowel or orange peel texture for their higher durability and ease of cleaning. In early formulations, it often contained white asbestos fibers. When asbestos was banned in ceiling treatments by the Clean Air Act in the United States, popcorn ceilings fell out of favor in much of the country. However, in order to minimize economic hardship to suppliers and installers, existing inventories of asbestos-bearing texturing materials were exempt from the ban, so it is possible to find asbestos in popcorn ceilings that were applied through the 1980s. After the ban, popcorn ceiling materials were created using a paper-based or Styrofoam product to create the texture, rather than asbestos.

  • Artex

    serch.it?q=Artex

    ArtexArtex is a surface coating used for interior decorating, most often found on ceilings, which allows the decorator to add a texture to it. The name Artex is a trademark of Artex Ltd., a company based in the United Kingdom. The name is a genericised trademark often used to refer to similar products from other manufacturers. Since 2005, the company has belonged to France's Saint-Gobain group.

  • Knockdown texture

    serch.it?q=Knockdown-texture

    Knockdown Texture is a drywall finishing style. It is a mottled texture, more intense than a simple flat finish, but less intense than orange peel, or popcorn, texture. Heavy knockdown applied with a spray hopper. Knockdown texture is created by watering down joint compound to a soupy consistency. A trowel is then used to apply the joint compound. The joint compound will begin to form stalactites as it dries. The trowel is then run over the surface of the drywall, knocking off the stalactites and leaving the mottled finish. A much more common, and faster technique is to apply the texture mud (which is slightly different from joint compound, in that it has less shrinkage upon drying) with a texture machine – a compressor which sprays mud instead of paint. This applies what is referred to as a splatter coat. The use of a compressor allows this to be applied to walls as well as ceilings. When knocking this down, the mud is allowed to dry for a short period, then skimmed with a knockdown knife – a large, usually plastic (to reduce noticeable edges) knife. Knockdown texture reduces construction costs because it conceals imperfections in the drywall that normally require higher more expensive stages of sand and prime for drywall installers.

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