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  • South Carolina Gamecocks

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    The South Carolina Gamecocks represent the University of South Carolina in the NCAA Division I. This unique moniker is held in honor of Thomas Sumter, a Revolutionary War hero from South Carolina who was nicknamed the "Carolina Gamecock" after British General Banastre Tarleton said Sumter "fought like a gamecock." While the men's teams were traditionally known as the Fighting Gamecocks and the women's teams were previously known as the Lady Gamecocks, this distinction was discontinued in part to eliminate any gender bias in the athletic department and in part to counter misconceptions about the gamecock mascot endorsing bloodsport. All of the University's varsity teams compete at the Division I level of the NCAA, and all but men's soccer and women's beach volleyball compete in the Southeastern Conference. Men's soccer competes in Conference USA and women's beach volleyball competes in the Coastal Collegiate Sports Association because the SEC does not sponsor those sports. The athletic department is supported with private money from the Gamecock Club. It was originally formed as the B.A.M.

  • History of the University of South Carolina

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    This History of the University of South Carolina began in the 18th century when intersectional differences arose between the Lowcountry and the Upstate. It was conceived that a state supported college located in the center of the state at Columbia, South Carolina would foster friendships between those of both regions thus allowing the state to present a united front to the nation when threatened with issues jeopardizing the South Carolina way of life. The University of South Carolina's history can be described in four distinct phases: a firebrand college (1801–1862), constant reorganization (1865–1891), college to university (1891–1944) and the state's university (1944–present). An 1872 illustration of the Horseshoe, USC's original campus. The Maxcy Monument is in the center

  • Magnolia Plantation and Gardens (Charleston, South Carolina)

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    Horticulture maze on the plantation Lake on the plantation Flowerdale — first planted in 1680 Red footbridge over green water Pond with heron statuesMagnolia Plantation and Gardens (464 acres, 187.77 hectares) is a historic house with gardens located on the Ashley River at 3550 Ashley River Road west of the Ashley, Charleston County, South Carolina. It is one of the oldest plantations in the South, and listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Magnolia Plantation is located near Charleston and directly across the Ashley River from North Charleston. The house and gardens are open daily; an admission fee is charged. The plantation dates to 1676, when Thomas and Ann Drayton built a house and small formal garden on the site. (The plantation remains under the control of the Drayton family after 15 generations.) The historic Drayton Hall was built in 1738 by John Drayton, father of judge John Drayton, Jr., on an adjoining property. Magnolia was originally a rice plantation, with extensive earthworks of dams and dikes built in fields along the river for irrigating land for rice cultivation. African slaves from rice-growing regions created the works. As time went on, the slaves, hoping to hold on to some piece of their African heritage, developed a creolized Gullah language which influenced a vibrant culture. The creativity of the slaves helped to retain many combined elements from Africa to this day in the Gullah Islands.

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