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  • Buddhist prayer beads

    serch.it?q=Buddhist-prayer-beads

    Buddhist prayer beads or malas (Sanskrit: "garland") are a traditional tool used to count the number of times a mantra is recited, breaths while meditating, counting prostrations, or the repetitions of a buddha's name. They are similar to other forms of prayer beads used in various world religions and therefore the term "Buddhist rosary" also appears. Conventional Buddhist tradition counts the beads at 108, signifying the mortal desires of mankind. The number is attributed to the Mokugenji (soapberry seed) Sutra wherein Shakyamuni Buddha instructed King Virudhaka to make such beads and recite the Three Jewels of Buddhism. In later years, various Buddhist sects would either retain the number of beads, or divide them into consecutive twos, fours, for brevity or informality. A decorative tassel is sometimes attached to the beads, flanked by talismans or amulets depending on one's local tradition. Because prayer beads are often painted in pigment, various traditional schools attribute a consecration ritual by the Sangha to the beads, to "open the eyes" for the purpose of achieving Enlightenment unique to the Karma of each believer.

  • Worry beads

    serch.it?q=Worry-beads

    Worry beads made from different materialsWorry beads or kombolói, kompoloi (, , bead collection; plural: , ) is a string of beads manipulated with one or two hands and used to pass time in Greek and Cypriot culture. Unlike the similar prayer beads used in many religious traditions, worry beads have no religious or ceremonial purpose.

  • Charm bracelet

    serch.it?q=Charm-bracelet

    Charm bracelet with multiple charms A charm bracelet is an item of jewellery worn around the wrist. It carries personal jewelled memories or "charms": decorative pendants or trinkets which signify important things in the wearer's life.

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