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  • Dual ignition

    serch.it?q=Dual-ignition

    A Jabiru 5100 flat-8 four-stroke aircraft engine with dual ignition, with two spark plugs per cylinder and two distributors.Dual Ignition is a system for spark-ignition engines, whereby critical ignition components, such as spark plugs and magnetos, are duplicated. Dual ignition is most commonly employed on aero engines, and is sometimes found on cars and motorcycles. Dual ignition provides two advantages: redundancy in the event of in-flight failure of one ignition system; and more efficient burning of the fuel-air mixture within the combustion chamber. In aircraft, redundancy is the prime consideration, but in other vehicles the main targets are efficient combustion and meeting emission law requirements.

  • Delco ignition system

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    The Delco ignition system, also known as the Kettering ignition system, is a type of Inductive discharge ignition system invented by Charles F. Kettering. It was first sold commercially on the 1910 Cadillac and was manufactured by Delco. Over time, this system was used extensively by all automobile and truck manufacturers until the development of capacitor discharge ignition (electronic ignition) systems in the 1960s. Delco ignition systems were also used by a number of early aircraft engines.

  • Spark plug

    serch.it?q=Spark-plug

    Spark plug with single side electrodeA spark plug (sometimes, in British English, a sparking plug, and, colloquially, a plug) is a device for delivering electric current from an ignition system to the combustion chamber of a spark-ignition engine to ignite the compressed fuel/air mixture by an electric spark, while containing combustion pressure within the engine. A spark plug has a metal threaded shell, electrically isolated from a central electrode by a porcelain insulator. The central electrode, which may contain a resistor, is connected by a heavily insulated wire to the output terminal of an ignition coil or magneto. The spark plug's metal shell is screwed into the engine's cylinder head and thus electrically grounded. The central electrode protrudes through the porcelain insulator into the combustion chamber, forming one or more spark gaps between the inner end of the central electrode and usually one or more protuberances or structures attached to the inner end of the threaded shell and designated the side, earth, or ground electrode(s).

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