Web Results
Content Results
  • Spider bite

    serch.it?q=Spider-bite

    A spider bite, also known as arachnidism, is an injury resulting from the bite of a spider. The effects of most bites are not serious. Most bites result in mild symptoms around the area of the bite. Rarely they may produce a necrotic skin wound or severe pain. Most spiders do not cause bites that are of importance. For a bite to be significant, substantial envenomation is required. Bites from the widow spiders involve a neurotoxic venom which produces a condition known as latrodectism. Symptoms may include: pain which may be at the bite or involve the chest and abdomen, sweating, muscle cramps and vomiting among others. Bites from the recluse spiders cause the condition loxoscelism, in which local necrosis of the surrounding skin and widespread breakdown of red blood cells may occur. Headaches, vomiting and a mild fever may also occur. Other spiders that can cause significant bites include: the Australian funnel-web spider and South American wandering spider. Efforts to prevent bites include clearing clutter and the use of pesticides. Most spider bites are managed with supportive care such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (including ibuprofen) for pain and antihistamines for itchiness. Opioids may be used if the pain is severe. While an antivenom exists for black widow spider venom, it is associated with anaphylaxis and therefore not commonly used in the United States. Antivenom against funnel web spider venom improves outcomes. Surgery may be required to repair the area of injured skin from some recluse bites. Spider bites may be overdiagnosed or misdiagnosed. In many reports of spider bites it is unclear if a spider bite actually occurred. Historically a number of conditions were attributed to spider bites. In the Middle Ages a condition claimed to arise from spider bites was tarantism, where people danced wildly. While necrosis has been attributed to the bites of a number of spiders, good evidence only supports this for recluse spiders.

  • Centipede bite

    serch.it?q=Centipede-bite

    A centipede bite is an injury resulting from the action of a centipede's forcipules, pincer-like appendages that pierce the skin and inject venom into the wound. Such a wound is not strictly speaking a bite, as the forcipules are a modified first pair of legs rather than true mouthparts. Clinically, the wound is viewed as a cutaneous condition characterized by paired hemorrhagic marks that form a chevron shape caused by the paired forcipules. The centipede's venom causes pain and swelling in the area of the bite, and may cause other reactions throughout the body. The majority of bites are not life-threatening to humans and present the greatest risk to children and those who develop allergic reactions.

  • Chilean recluse spider

    serch.it?q=Chilean-recluse-spider

    Immature male The Chilean recluse spider is a venomous spider, Loxosceles laeta, of the family Sicariidae (formerly of the family Loxoscelidae). In Spanish, it (and other South American recluse spiders) is known as ''''', or "corner spider"; in Portuguese, as ''''' or "brown spider". This spider is considered by many to be the most dangerous of the recluse spiders, and its bite is known to frequently result in severe systemic reactions, including death.

Map Box 1