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  • Station wagon

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    A station wagon — also called estate car, estate or wagon — is a car body style which has a two-box design, a large cargo area and a rear tailgate that is hinged at roof level. The body style is similar to hatchbacks, however a station wagons are longer and are more likely to have the roofline extended to the rear of the car (resulting in a vertical surface at the rear) to maximize the cargo space. The first station wagons, produced in the United States around 1910, were wood-bodied conversions of an existing passenger car. During the 1930s, the car manufacturers in the United States, United Kingdom and France began to produce station wagons models, and by the 1950s the wood rear bodywork had been replaced by an all-steel body. Wagon models sold well from the 1950s to the 1970s, however since then sales have declined as minivans and SUVs have increased in popularity. The names "station wagon" and "estate car" are a result due to the initial purpose of the car being to transport people and luggage between a country estate and the nearest train station.

  • Subaru 360

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    The Subaru 360 is a rear-engined, two-door city car manufactured and marketed from 1958 to 1971 by Subaru. As the company's first automobile, production reached 392,000 over its 12-year model run. Noted for its small overall size, 1,000 lb curb weight, monocoque construction, swing axle rear suspension, fiberglass roof panel, and rear-hinged doors, the inexpensive car was designed in response to the Japanese government's light car or Kei car regulations and its proposal for a larger "national car," both intended to help motorize the post WWII Japanese population. The 360's overall size and engine capacity complied with Japan's Kei car regulations. Nicknamed the "ladybug" in Japan, and ultimately superseded by R-2, the 360 was one of Japan's most popular cars and was available in a single generation in two-door, station wagon, "convertible" (coupe with roll-back fabric roof) and sport model variants.10,000 were sold in the United States, imported by Malcolm Bricklin — advertised as "Cheap and Ugly." The nameplate 360 derived from its tax-limited engine displacement: 356 cc.

  • Subaru World Rally Team

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    The Subaru World Rally Team (SWRT) was Subaru's World Rally Championship (WRC) team. It used a distinctive blue with yellow color scheme that is a throwback to the sponsorship deal with State Express 555, a BAT cigarette brand popular in Asia. 555 logos were found on Subaru cars from 1993 to 2003. Subaru's WRC efforts date back to 1980, however, the team, in its current form, has existed since 1989, when the British firm Prodrive took over its operations, and its base moved from Japan to Banbury, England. Subaru used the team to showcase its symmetrical all wheel drive technology. It has credited the increased sales of its vehicles, especially the Subaru Impreza, with its success in the World Rally Championship, in addition to popularizing its all-wheel-drive system. Its 2008 season drivers were Petter Solberg with co-driver Phil Mills, and Chris Atkinson with co-driver Stéphane Prévot. David Richards was the team's Principal, and a founder and chairman of Prodrive. Paul Howarth was the team's operations director and team manager. He replaced David Lapworth in 2006. Richard Taylor is the team's managing director. The team was historically an extremely strong one, competing in the WRC longer than any other manufacturer team in their current form. It has won the manufacturers' championship three times in 1995, 1996, and 1997, and the drivers' championship three times, in 1995, 2001, and 2003. The team's performance since the 2005 season, when Petter Solberg secured second position in the driver's championship, has been far lower than expected and the subject of much criticism. The team's 2006 season, one that has been described as "disappointing" by Richard Taylor, was the subject of a Discovery Channel series called Engineering the World Rally which aired in 2007. The 2007 season was little better, and called the "second season from hell" by Phil Mills.The team withdrew from WRC competition at the end of the 2008 season due to widespread economic downturn.

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