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  • Cholecystectomy

    serch.it?q=Cholecystectomy

    Cholecystectomy is the surgical removal of the gallbladder. Cholecystectomy is a common treatment of symptomatic gallstones and other gallbladder conditions. In 2011, cholecystectomy was the 8th most common operating room procedure performed in hospitals in the United States. Cholecystectomy can be performed either laparoscopically, using a video camera, or via an open surgical technique. The surgery is usually successful in relieving symptoms, but up to 10% of people may continue to experience similar symptoms after cholecystectomy, a condition called postcholecystectomy syndrome. Complications of cholecystectomy include bile duct injury, wound infection, bleeding, retained gallstones, abscess formation and stenosis (narrowing) of the bile duct.

  • Ramakanta Panda

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    Ramakanta Panda is the Chief Consultant for Cardiovascular Thoracic Surgery and the Vice Chairman and Managing Director of the Asian Heart Institute, a speciality cardiac care hospital under the aegis of Asian Hospitals, at the Bandra-Kurla Complex in Mumbai, India. He set up the Asian Heart Institute in 2002. As of 2016, Dr.Panda has performed over 20,000 cardiac surgeries including over 1800 redo bypass surgeries and over 3000 high risk surgeries. He specialises in coronary artery bypass grafting using only arterial grafts over a beating heart, redo bypass surgery, valve repair and repairing complex aneurysms. Dr. Panda's 99.6% success rate in bypass surgery is widely recognized as a world-class standard. Dr Panda is also called 'one of the safest heart surgeons in the world' and 'the 'surgeon with the safest hands'. Medgate Today honored Dr.Panda as the No 1 heart surgeon and one of the 25 living legends in the healthcare of India.

  • Inguinal hernia surgery

    serch.it?q=Inguinal-hernia-surgery

    Inguinal hernia surgery is an operation to repair a weakness in the abdominal wall that abnormally allows abdominal contents to slip into a narrow tube called the inguinal canal in the groin region. Surgery remains the ultimate treatment for all types of hernias as they will not get better on their own, however not all require immediate repair. Elective surgery is offered to most patients taking into account their level of pain, discomfort, degree of disruption in normal activity, as well as their overall level of health. Emergency surgery is typically reserved for patients with life-threatening complications of inguinal hernias such as incarceration and strangulation. Incarceration occurs when intra-abdominal fat or small intestine becomes stuck within the canal and cannot slide back into the abdominal cavity either on its own or with manual maneuvers. Left untreated, incarceration may progress to bowel strangulation as a result of restricted blood supply to the trapped segment of small intestine causing that portion to die. Successful outcomes of repair are usually measured via rates of hernia recurrence, pain and subsequent quality of life.

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