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  • Subacute thyroiditis

    serch.it?q=Subacute-thyroiditis

    Subacute thyroiditis is a form of thyroiditis that can be a cause of both thyrotoxicosis and hypothyroidism. It is uncommon and can affect individuals of both sexes and people of all ages. The most common form, subacute granulomatous, or de Quervain's, thyroiditis manifests as a sudden and painful enlargement of the thyroid gland accompanied with fever, malaise and muscle aches. Indirect evidence has implicated viral infection in the etiology of subacute thyroiditis. This evidence is limited to preceding upper respiratory tract infection, elevated viral antibody levels, and both seasonal and geographical clustering of cases. There may be a genetic predisposition. Nishihara and coworkers studied the clinical features of subacute thyroiditis in 852 mostly 40- to 50-year-old women in Japan. They noted seasonal clusters (summer to early autumn) and most subjects presented with neck pain. Fever and symptoms of thyrotoxicosis were present in two thirds of subjects. Upper respiratory tract infections in the month preceding presentation were reported in only 1 in 5 subjects. Recurrent episodes following resolution of the initial episode were rare, occurring in just 1.6% of cases. Laboratory markers for thyroid inflammation and dysfunction typically peaked within one week of onset of illness.

  • Pretibial myxedema

    serch.it?q=Pretibial-myxedema

    Pretibial myxedema (myxoedema (UK), also known as Graves' dermopathy, thyroid dermopathy, Jadassohn-Dösseker disease or Myxoedema tuberosum) is an infiltrative dermopathy, resulting as a rare complication of Graves' disease, with an incidence rate of about 1-5% in patients.

  • Hypothyroidism

    serch.it?q=Hypothyroidism

    Hypothyroidism, also called underactive thyroid or low thyroid, is a disorder of the endocrine system in which the thyroid gland does not produce enough thyroid hormone. It can cause a number of symptoms, such as poor ability to tolerate cold, a feeling of tiredness, constipation, depression, and weight gain. Occasionally there may be swelling of the front part of the neck due to goiter. Untreated hypothyroidism during pregnancy can lead to delays in growth and intellectual development in the baby or cretinism. Worldwide, too little iodine in the diet is the most common cause of hypothyroidism. In countries with enough iodine in the diet, the most common cause of hypothyroidism is the autoimmune condition Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Less common causes include: previous treatment with radioactive iodine, injury to the hypothalamus or the anterior pituitary gland, certain medications, a lack of a functioning thyroid at birth, or previous thyroid surgery. The diagnosis of hypothyroidism, when suspected, can be confirmed with blood tests measuring thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyroxine levels. Salt iodization has prevented hypothyroidism in many populations.

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