Web Results
Content Results
  • Phalen maneuver

    serch.it?q=Phalen-maneuver

    Transverse section across the wrist and digits. (The median nerve is the yellow dot near the center. The carpal tunnel is not labeled, but the circular structure surrounding the median nerve is visible.)Phalen's maneuver is a diagnostic test for carpal tunnel syndrome discovered by an American orthopedist named George S. Phalen.

  • Peripheral neuropathy

    serch.it?q=Peripheral-neuropathy

    Peripheral neuropathy (PN) is damage to or a disease affecting nerves, which may impair sensation, movement, gland or organ function, or other aspects of health, depending on the type of nerve affected. Common causes include systemic diseases (such as diabetes or leprosy), hyperglycemia-induced glycation, vitamin deficiency, medication (e.g., chemotherapy, or commonly prescribed antibiotics including metronidazole and the fluoroquinolone class of antibiotics (Ciprofloxacin, Levaquin, Avelox etc.)), traumatic injury, including ischemia, radiation therapy, excessive alcohol consumption, immune system disease, coeliac disease, or viral infection. It can also be genetic (present from birth) or idiopathic (no known cause). In conventional medical usage, the word neuropathy (neuro-, "nervous system" and -pathy, "disease of") without modifier usually means peripheral neuropathy. Neuropathy affecting just one nerve is called "mononeuropathy" and neuropathy involving nerves in roughly the same areas on both sides of the body is called "symmetrical polyneuropathy" or simply "polyneuropathy".

  • Thoracic outlet syndrome

    serch.it?q=Thoracic-outlet-syndrome

    Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is a condition in which there is compression of the nerves, arteries, or veins in the passageway from the lower neck to the armpit. There are three main types: neurogenic, venous, and arterial. The neurogenic type is the most common and presents with pain, weakness, and occasionally loss of muscle at the base of the thumb. The venous type results in swelling, pain, and possibly a bluish coloration of the arm. The arterial type results in pain, coldness, and paleness of the arm. TOS may result from trauma, repetitive arm movements, tumors, pregnancy, or anatomical variations such as a cervical rib. The diagnosis may be supported by nerve conduction studies and medical imaging. Other conditions that can produce similar symptoms include rotator cuff tear, cervical disc disorders, fibromyalgia, multiple sclerosis, and complex regional pain syndrome. Initial treatment for the neurogenic type is with exercises to strengthen the chest muscles and improve posture. NSAIDs such as naproxen may be used for pain. Surgery is typically done for the arterial and venous types and for the neurogenic type if it does not improve with other treatments. Blood thinners may be used to treat or prevent blood clots. The condition affects about 1% of the population. It is more common in women than men and it occurs most commonly between 20 and 50 years of age. The condition was first described in 1818 and the current term "thoracic outlet syndrome" first used in 1956.

Map Box 1