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  • Sheetz

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    Altoona. Sheetz fuel canopy in Breezewood, Pennsylvania A Sheetz location in Kent, Ohio. Map of Sheetz locations as of July 2011Sheetz, Inc. is an American chain of convenience stores and coffee shops owned by the Sheetz family. The stores sell a mix of fast food and convenience store items, and nearly all of them sell gasoline as well. Its headquarters are in Altoona, Pennsylvania. Stores are located in Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Maryland, Ohio, Virginia, and eastern and north-central North Carolina. Sheetz has long employed the "Z" that the name ends with, and the "Sh" that the name begins with, in various marketing efforts. These include the Sheetz loadable gift card, the Sheetz Z-Card; the Sheetz chicken wings, known and marketed as "Shwingz"; the Sheetz breakfast sandwich, known and marketed as "Shmuffinz"; and their "Nachoz."

  • Diesel locomotive

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    These Pacific National-operated locos show three styles of diesel locomotive body: box cab (rear), hood unit (center) and cab unit (front). EMD 12-567B Roots-blown 12-cylinder diesel engine (square "hand holes"), stored pending rebuild, and missing some components, most notably the two Roots blowers, with a 16-567C or D 16-cylinder engine (round "hand holes"). A diesel locomotive is a type of railway locomotive in which the prime mover is a diesel engine. Several types of diesel locomotive have been developed, differing mainly in the means by which mechanical power is conveyed to the driving wheels. Early internal combusition locomotives and railcars used kerosene and gasoline as their fuel. Dr. Rudolf Diesel patented his first compression ignition engine in 1898, and steady improvements in the design of diesel engines reduced their physical size and improved their power-to-weight ratio to a point where one could be mounted in a locomotive.

  • 1979 oil crisis

    serch.it?q=1979-oil-crisis

    US oil field production vs imports and exports The 1979 (or second) oil crisis or oil shock occurred in the world due to decreased oil output in the wake of the Iranian Revolution. Despite the fact that global oil supply decreased by only ~4%, widespread panic resulted, driving the price far higher. The price of crude oil more than doubled to $39.50 per barrel over the next 12 months, and long lines once again appeared at gas stations, as they had in the 1973 oil crisis. In 1980, following the outbreak of the Iran–Iraq War, oil production in Iran nearly stopped, and Iraq's oil production was severely cut as well. Economic recessions were triggered in the United States and other countries. Oil prices did not subside to pre-crisis levels until the mid-1980s. After 1980, oil prices began a 20-year decline, except for a brief rebound during the Gulf War, eventually reaching a 60 percent fall-off during the 1990s. As with the 1973 crisis, global politics and power balance were impacted. Oil exporters such as Mexico, Nigeria, and Venezuela expanded production; the Soviet Union became the top world producer; North Sea and Alaskan oil flooded the market. It seemed that the United States of America and Norway had much more oil reserves than forecasted in the 1970s. OPEC lost influence.

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