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  • Trichomoniasis

    serch.it?q=Trichomoniasis

    Trichomoniasis (trich) is an infectious disease caused by the parasite Trichomonas vaginalis. About 70% of women and men do not have symptoms when infected. When symptoms do occur they typically begin 5 to 28 days after exposure. Symptoms can include itching in the genital area, a bad smelling thin vaginal discharge, burning with urination, and pain with sex. Having trichomoniasis increases the risk of getting HIV/AIDS. It may also cause complications during pregnancy. Trichomoniasis is a sexually transmitted infection (STI) which is most often spread through vaginal, oral, or anal sex. It can also spread through genital touching. People who are infected may spread the disease even when symptoms are not present. Diagnosis is by finding the parasite in the vaginal fluid using a microscope, culturing the vagina or urine, or testing for the parasite's DNA. If present other sexually transmitted infections should be tested for. Methods of prevention include not having sex, using condoms, not douching, and being tested for STIs before having sex with a new partner. Trichomoniasis can be cured with antibiotics, either metronidazole or tinidazole. Sexual partners should also be treated. About 20% of people get infected again within three months of treatment. There were about 122 million new cases of trichomoniasis in 2015. In the United States there are about 2 million women affected. It occurs more often in women than men. Trichomonas vaginalis was first identified in 1836 by Alfred Donné. It was first recognized as causing this disease in 1916.

  • Trichomonas vaginalis

    serch.it?q=Trichomonas-vaginalis

    Trichomonas vaginalis is an anaerobic, flagellated protozoan parasite and the causative agent of trichomoniasis. It is the most common pathogenic protozoan infection of humans in industrialized countries. Infection rates between men and women are similar with women being symptomatic, while infections in men are usually asymptomatic. Transmission usually occurs via direct, skin-to-skin contact with an infected individual, most often through vaginal intercourse. The WHO has estimated that 160 million cases of infection are acquired annually worldwide. The estimates for North America alone are between 5 and 8 million new infections each year, with an estimated rate of asymptomatic cases as high as 50%. Usually treatment consists of metronidazole and tinidazole.

  • Trichomoniasis

    serch.it?q=Trichomoniasis

    Trichomoniasis (trich) is an infectious disease caused by the parasite Trichomonas vaginalis. About 70% of women and men do not have symptoms when infected. When symptoms do occur they typically begin 5 to 28 days after exposure. Symptoms can include itching in the genital area, a bad smelling thin vaginal discharge, burning with urination, and pain with sex. Having trichomoniasis increases the risk of getting HIV/AIDS. It may also cause complications during pregnancy. Trichomoniasis is a sexually transmitted infection (STI) which is most often spread through vaginal, oral, or anal sex. It can also spread through genital touching. People who are infected may spread the disease even when symptoms are not present. Diagnosis is by finding the parasite in the vaginal fluid using a microscope, culturing the vagina or urine, or testing for the parasite's DNA. If present other sexually transmitted infections should be tested for. Methods of prevention include not having sex, using condoms, not douching, and being tested for STIs before having sex with a new partner. Trichomoniasis can be cured with antibiotics, either metronidazole or tinidazole. Sexual partners should also be treated. About 20% of people get infected again within three months of treatment. There were about 122 million new cases of trichomoniasis in 2015. In the United States there are about 2 million women affected. It occurs more often in women than men. Trichomonas vaginalis was first identified in 1836 by Alfred Donné. It was first recognized as causing this disease in 1916.

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