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  • Lipedema

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    Lipedema is a disorder where there is enlargement of both legs due to deposits of fat under the skin. Typically it gets worse over time, pain may be present, and sufferers bruise easily. In severe cases the trunk and upper body may be involved. Lipedema is commonly misdiagnosed. The cause is unknown but is believed to involve genetics and hormonal factors. It often runs in families. Risk factors include being overweight or obese. Other conditions that may present similarly include obesity, lipohypertrophy, chronic venous insufficiency, and lymphedema. A number of treatments may be useful including physiotherapy and exercise. Physiotherapy may help to preserve mobility for a little longer than would otherwise be the case. Exercise, only as much as the patient is able to do without causing damage to the joints, may help with overall fitness but will not prevent progression of the disease. While surgery can remove fat tissue it can also damage lymphatic vessels. Treatment does not typically result in complete resolution. It is estimated to affect up to 11% of women. Onset is typically during puberty, pregnancy, or menopause.

  • Meralgia paraesthetica

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    Meralgia paresthetica or meralgia paraesthetica (or Bernhardt-Roth syndrome), is numbness or pain in the outer thigh not caused by injury to the thigh, but by injury to a nerve that extends from the spinal column to the thigh. This chronic neurological disorder involves a single nerve—the lateral cutaneous nerve of the thigh, which is also called the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (and hence the syndrome lateral femoral cutaneous neuropathy). The term "meralgia paraesthetica" combines four Greek roots to mean "thigh pain with anomalous perception". The disorder has also been nicknamed skinny pants syndrome, in reference to a rise in teenagers wearing skin-tight trousers.

  • Edema

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    Edema, also spelled oedema or œdema, is an abnormal accumulation of fluid in the interstitium, located beneath the skin and in the cavities of the body, which can cause severe pain. Clinically, edema manifests as swelling. The amount of interstitial fluid is determined by the balance of fluid homeostasis and the increased secretion of fluid into the interstitium. The word is from Greek oídēma meaning "swelling". The condition is also known (mostly archaic) as dropsy.

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