Web Results
Content Results
  • Olfactory reference syndrome

    serch.it?q=Olfactory-reference-syndrome

    Olfactory reference syndrome (ORS) is a psychiatric condition in which there is a persistent false belief and preoccupation with the idea of emitting abnormal body odors which the patient thinks are foul and offensive to other individuals. People with this condition often misinterpret others' behaviors, e.g. sniffing, touching nose or opening a window, as being referential to an unpleasant body odor which in reality is non-existent and can not be detected by other people. This disorder is often accompanied by shame, embarrassment, significant distress, avoidance behavior, social phobia and social isolation. The term olfactory reference syndrome comes from: Olfactory, pertaining to the sense of smell. Reference, because of the belief that the behavior of others is referential to a supposed odor. Syndrome, because it is a recognizable set of features that occur together.

  • Bruce effect

    serch.it?q=Bruce-effect

    The Bruce effect, or pregnancy block, is the tendency for female rodents to terminate their pregnancies following exposure to the scent of an unfamiliar male. The effect was first noted in 1959 by Hilda M. Bruce, and has primarily been studied in laboratory mice (Mus musculus). In mice, pregnancy can only be terminated prior to embryo implantation, but other species will interrupt even a late-term pregnancy. The Bruce effect is also observed in deer-mice, meadow voles, collared lemmings, and it has also been proposed, but not confirmed, in other non-rodent species such as lions and geladas.

  • Vaginal yeast infection

    serch.it?q=Vaginal-yeast-infection

    Vaginal yeast infection, also known as candidal vulvovaginitis and vaginal thrush, is excessive growth of yeast in the vagina that results in irritation. The most common symptom is vaginal itching, which may be severe. Other symptoms include burning with urination, white and thick vaginal discharge that typically does not smell bad, pain with sex, and redness around the vagina. Symptoms often worsen just before a woman's period. Vaginal yeast infections are due to excessive growth of Candida. These yeast are normally present in the vagina in small numbers. It is not classified as a sexually transmitted infection; however, it may occur more often in those who are frequently sexually active. Risk factors include taking antibiotics, pregnancy, diabetes, and HIV/AIDS. Eating a diet high in simple sugar may also play a role. Tight clothing, type of underwear, and personal hygiene do not appear to be factors. Diagnosis is by testing a sample of vaginal discharge. As symptoms are similar to that of the sexually transmitted infections, chlamydia and gonorrhea, testing may be recommended. Despite the lack of evidence, wearing cotton underwear and loose fitting clothing is often recommended as a preventative measure. Avoiding douching and scented hygiene products is also recommended. Treatment is with an antifungal medication. This may be either as a cream such as clotrimazole or with oral medications such as fluconazole. Probiotics have not been found to be useful for active infections. About 75% of women have at least one vaginal yeast infection at some point in their lives while nearly half have at least two. About 5% have more than three infections in a single year. It is the second most common cause of vaginal inflammation after bacterial vaginosis.

Map Box 1