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  • Horse trailer

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    A bumper-pull horse trailer A state-of-the-art semi-trailer used to haul horses. Large trailers are attached with a fifth-wheel coupling. A horse trailer or horse van (also called a horse float in Australia and New Zealand or horsebox in the British Isles) is used to transport horses. There are many different designs, ranging in size from small units capable of holding two or three horses, able to be pulled by a pickup truck or even a SUV; to gooseneck designs that carry six to eight horses, usually pulled by 1-ton dually-style pickups. There are also large semi-trailers that can haul a significant number of animals. In the UK, a horsebox may also refer to a motorised vehicle adapted to carry horses (generally known as a horse van in North America or Australasia), or a railway vehicle specifically designed to carry horses. The least expensive type of trailer is the stock trailer, a trailer designed for cattle that is enclosed on the bottom, but has slits at approximately the eye level of the animals to allow ventilation. Trailers designed specifically for horses are more elaborate.

  • Bedford Vehicles

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    Bedford Vehicles, usually shortened to just Bedford, was a brand of vehicle manufactured by Vauxhall Motors, which was ultimately owned by General Motors (GM). Established in April 1931 and constructing commercial vehicles, Bedford Vehicles was a leading international lorry brand, with substantial export sales of light, medium, and heavy lorries throughout the world. It was General Motors Europe's most profitable venture for several years. Bedford's core heavy trucks business was divested by GM as AWD Trucks in 1987, whilst the Bedford brand continued to be used on light commercial vehicles and car-derived vans based on Vauxhall/Opel, Isuzu and Suzuki designs. The brand was retired in 1991; subsequent GM Europe light commercials were branded as either Vauxhall or Opel, depending on the market.

  • Lincoln Town Car

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    The Lincoln Town Car is a model line of full-size luxury sedans that was marketed by the Lincoln division of the American automaker Ford Motor Company from 1980 to 2011. Taking its nameplate from a limousine body style, the Town Car first appeared in 1959 as a sub-model of the Continental Mark IV, returning as a Lincoln Continental trim line from 1969 to 1980. Following a revision of the Lincoln model line, the Lincoln Town Car became a distinct product line for 1981, replacing the Continental. Town Cars were produced across three generations, each using the rear-wheel drive Ford Panther platform. While designed with its own exterior and interior, chassis and mechanical components were shared with the Mercury Grand Marquis and Ford (LTD) Crown Victoria. During its production, the Town Car was offered nearly exclusively as a four-door sedan (a two-door sedan was offered for 1981 only). Outside of the retail segment, many examples of the Town Car were sold for fleet and livery use, serving as a popular limousine platform throughout its production.

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