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  • Dodge Ram SRT-10

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    The Dodge Ram SRT-10 is a sport pickup truck that was produced by American automaker Dodge in limited numbers. It was introduced at the January 2002 North American International Auto Show, but was not put into production until 2004.

  • Ford F-Series (third generation)

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    The third-generation of the Ford F-Series are trucks that were produced by Ford from 1956 to 1960. Following its competitors at Dodge and General Motors, Ford widened the front bodywork to integrate the cab and front fenders together. Going a step further, the F-Series integrated the hood into the bodywork with a clamshell design; the feature would stay part of the F-Series for two decades. Although offered previously, the optional chrome grille was far more prominent than before. In the rear, two types of pickup boxes were offered, starting a new naming convention: the traditional separate-fender box was dubbed "FlareSide", while "StyleSide" boxes integrated the pickup bed, cab, and front fenders together. As before, Ford still offered a "Low GVWR" version of each model. In May 1957, Ford discontinued building trucks at the Highland Park Ford Plant in Highland Park, Michigan. All light and medium trucks were transferred to 10 other plants in the USA. Heavy-duty trucks (above F-350) were transferred to Kentucky Truck Assembly in Louisville, Kentucky. Third generation trucks were built in Brazil as the F-100, F-350, and F-600 from 1962 until 1971. OHV sixes and V8s were the same ones as used in Ford cars of the era. This was the last generation of the panel van. Ford would not offer a full-size van again until the 1968 introduction of the second generation E-Series.

  • Ford Aerostar

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    The Ford Aerostar is a range of passenger and cargo vans that was manufactured and marketed by Ford in the United States and Canada; a limited number were exported outside of North America. The first minivan sold by Ford, the Aerostar was sold in a single generation from the 1986 to 1997 model years. Introduced shortly before the Ford Taurus, the vehicle derived its nameplate from its slope-nosed "one-box" exterior (although over six feet tall, the body of the Aerostar retained a , besting the Lincoln Mark VII). For the 1995 model year, the front-wheel drive Ford Windstar was introduced to replace the Aerostar; both minivans were sold concurrently through the 1997 model year. In the Ford model line, the role of the Aerostar cargo van was left unfilled; the closest successor is the Ford Transit Connect, introduced in 2010. A total of 2,029,577 Aerostars were produced from 1985 to 1997. All production was sourced from the now-closed St. Louis Assembly Plant in Hazelwood, Missouri.

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