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  • Live steam

    serch.it?q=Live-steam

    A hand-crafted, coal-fired, 1:8 scale 2-10-0 'live steam' locomotive in gauge, built in 14,000 hours over a period of 15 years. A "High Line" representation of a Whitelegg designed Baltic Tank in LT&S Livery. This engine runs on a gauge of 3.5 inches known as Gauge III and is powerful enough to pull several people. High Lines are a configuration of a continuously elevated track and riders sit side-saddle or with legs straddling the track depending on lineside clearances.Live steam is steam under pressure, obtained by heating water in a boiler. The steam is used to operate stationary or moving equipment. A live steam machine or device is one powered by steam, but the term is usually reserved for those that are replicas, scale models, toys, or otherwise used for heritage, museum, entertainment, or recreational purposes, to distinguish them from similar devices powered by electricity or some other more convenient method but designed to look as if they are steam-powered. Revenue-earning steam-powered machines such as mainline and narrow gauge steam locomotives, steamships, and power-generating steam turbines are not normally referred to as "live steam".

  • OO gauge

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    OO gauge or OO scale (also spelled 00 gauge and 00 scale) model railways are the most popular standard-gauge model railway tracks in the United Kingdom. This track gauge is one of several 4 mm-scale standards (4 mm to 1 foot or 1:76.2) used, but it is the only one to be served by the major manufacturers. Despite this, the OO track gauge of is inaccurate for 4 mm scale, and other gauges of the same scale have arisen to better serve the desires of some modellers for greater scale accuracy.

  • Glossary of rail transport terms

    serch.it?q=Glossary-of-rail-transport-terms

    Rail terminology is a form of technical terminology. The difference between the American term railroad and the international term railway (used by the International Union of Railways and English-speaking countries outside the United States) is the most significant difference in rail terminology. There are also others, due to the parallel development of rail transport systems in different parts of the world. Various global terms are presented here; where a term has multiple names, this is indicated. The abbreviation "UIC" refers to standard terms adopted by the International Union of Railways in its official publications and thesaurus.

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