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  • Head mirror

    serch.it?q=Head-mirror

    Head mirror A doctor using a head mirror to illuminate his patient's nasal passages. A head mirror is a simple diagnostic device, stereotypically worn by physicians, but less so in recent decades as they have become somewhat obsolete. A head mirror is mostly used for examination of the ear, nose & throat. It comprises a circular concave mirror, with a small hole in the middle, and is attached to a head band. The mirror is worn over the physician's eye of choice, with the concave mirror surface facing outwards and the hole directly over the physician's eye, providing illumination like a ring light. In use, the patient sits and faces the physician. A bright lamp is positioned adjacent to the patient's head, pointing toward the physician's face and hence towards the head mirror. The light from the lamp reflects off the mirror, along the line of sight of the user, with the light being somewhat concentrated by the curvature of the mirror. When used properly, the head mirror thus provides excellent shadow-free illumination.

  • Mercury glass

    serch.it?q=Mercury-glass

    English mercury glass objectsMercury glass (or silvered glass) is glass that was blown double walled, then silvered between the layers with a liquid silvering solution, and sealed. Although mercury was originally used to provide the reflective coating for mirrors, elemental mercury was never used to create tableware. Silvered glass was free-blown, then silvered with a solution containing silver nitrate and grape sugar in solution, heated, then closed. Sealing methods include metal discs covered with a glass round or a cork inserted into the unpolished pontil scar. "Mercury" silvered glass was produced originally around 1840 until at least 1930 in Bohemia (now the Czech Republic), Germany and was also manufactured in England from 1849 to 1855. Edward Varnish and Frederick Hale Thomson patented the technique for silvering glass vessels in 1849. The English examples were often cased with a layer of colored glass then cut to silver as illustrated in the photograph. Blown glass is made utilizing a long metal blowpipe by the glass blower who shapes and heats the object.

  • Mirror

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    A mirror, reflecting a vase A first surface mirror coated with aluminum and enhanced with dielectric coatings. The angle of the incident light (represented by both the light in the mirror and the shadow behind it) matches the exact angle of reflection (the reflected light shining on the table). Mirror image in a surveillance mirror, which reflects the person taking the photo. A mirror is an object that reflects light in such a way that, for incident light in some range of wavelengths, the reflected light preserves many or most of the detailed physical characteristics of the original light, called specular reflection. This is different from other light-reflecting objects that do not preserve much of the original wave signal other than color and diffuse reflected light, such as flat-white paint. The most familiar type of mirror is the plane mirror, which has a flat surface. Curved mirrors are also used, to produce magnified or diminished images or focus light or simply distort the reflected image.

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