Web Results
Content Results
  • Wheelwright

    serch.it?q=Wheelwright

    reenactor New Salem, Illinois Wheelwrights Workshop at the Amberley Working Museum, West Sussex, EnglandWorldwide Wheelwright Phill Gregson fitting Iron 'strakes' to a traditional wooden wheel. A wheelwright is a craftsman who builds or repairs wooden wheels. The word is the combination of "wheel" and the archaic word "wright", which comes from the Old English word "wryhta", meaning a woodworker as in Wheelwright, Shipwright and Arkwright This occupational name eventually became the English surname Wheelwright, akin to Arkwright and Wright, the latter pertaining to all woodworkers, or to metal workers being called Smith. These tradesmen made wheels for carts (cartwheels), wagons (wains), traps and coaches and the belt drives of steam powered machinery. First constructing the hub (called the nave), the spokes and the rim/felloe segments (pronounced fillies any wheelwright will tell you the spokes are just to keep the nave from the fillies) and assembling them all into a unit working from the center of the wheel outwards. Most wheels were made from wood, but other materials have been used, such as bone and horn, for decorative or other purposes.

  • Horse-drawn vehicle

    serch.it?q=Horse-drawn-vehicle

    A horse tram (horsecar) in Danzig, Germany (present day Gdańsk, Poland) A horse-drawn vehicle is a mechanized piece of equipment pulled by one horse or by a team of horses. These vehicles typically had two or four wheels and were used to carry passengers and/or a load. They were once common worldwide, but they have mostly been replaced by automobiles and other forms of self-propelled transport.

  • Artillery wheel

    serch.it?q=Artillery-wheel

    Artillery wheel The artillery wheel was developed for use on gun carriages when it was found that the lateral forces involved in horse artillery manoeuvres caused normally constructed cart wheels to collapse. Rather than having its spokes mortised into a wooden nave (hub), it has them fitted together (mitred) then bolted into a metal nave. Its tyre is shrunk onto the rim in the usual way but it is also bolted on for security. A normal wagon wheel is dished so that in its lowest part, the spokes are perpendicular to the ground thus supporting the weight (with the axle not truly horizontal but angled downward toward the outside about 5 degrees). This is not done with artillery wheels.

Map Box 1