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  • Cheilitis

    serch.it?q=Cheilitis

    Cheilitis is inflammation of the lips. This inflammation may include the perioral skin (the skin around the mouth), the vermilion border, and/or the labial mucosa. The skin and the vermilion border are more commonly involved, as the mucosa is less affected by inflammatory and allergic reactions. It is a general term, and there are many recognized types and different causes. Cheilitis can be either acute or chronic. Most cheilitis is caused by exogenous factors such as dryness (chapping) and acute sun exposure. Patch testing may identify allergens that cause cheilitis.

  • Angular cheilitis

    serch.it?q=Angular-cheilitis

    Angular cheilitis (AC) is inflammation of one or both corners of the mouth. Often the corners are red with skin breakdown and crusting. It can also be itchy or painful. The condition can last for days to years. Angular cheilitis is a type of cheilitis (inflammation of the lips). Angular cheilitis can be caused by infection, irritation, or allergies. Infections include by fungi such as Candida albicans and bacteria such as Staph. aureus. Irritants include poorly fitting dentures, licking the lips or drooling, mouth breathing resulting in a dry mouth, sun exposure, overclosure of the mouth, smoking, and minor trauma. Allergies may include substances like toothpaste, makeup, and food. Often a number of factors are involved. Other factors may include poor nutrition or poor immune function. Diagnosis may be helped by testing for infections and patch testing for allergies. Treatment for angular cheilitis is typically based on the underlying causes along with the use of a barrier cream. Frequently an antifungal and antibacterial cream is also tried. Angular cheilitis is a fairly common problem, with estimates that it affects 0.7% of the population. It occurs most often in the 30s to 60s, although is also relatively common in children. In the developing world, iron and vitamin deficiencies are a common cause.

  • Angioedema

    serch.it?q=Angioedema

    Angioedema is an area of swelling of the lower layer of skin and tissue just under the skin or mucous membranes. The swelling may occur in the face, tongue, larynx, abdomen, or arms and legs. Often it is associated with hives, which are swelling within the upper skin. Onset is typically over minutes to hours. The underlying mechanism typically involves histamine or bradykinin. The version related to histamine is due to an allergic reaction to agents such as insect bites, foods, or medications. The version related to bradykinin may occur due to an inherited problem known as C1 esterase inhibitor deficiency, medications known as angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, or a lymphoproliferative disorder. Efforts to protect the airway may include intubation or cricothyroidotomy. Histamine related angioedema can be treated with antihistamines, corticosteroids, and epinephrine. In those with bradykinin related disease a C1 esterase inhibitor, ecallantide, or icatibant may be used. Fresh frozen plasma may be used instead. In the United States the disease affects about 100,000 people a year.

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