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  • Autoimmune thyroiditis

    serch.it?q=Autoimmune-thyroiditis

    Autoimmune thyroiditis, (or Chronic Autoimmune thyroiditis), is a chronic disease in which the body interprets the thyroid glands and its hormone products T3, T4 and TSH as threats, therefore producing special antibodies that target the thyroid’s cells, thereby destroying it. It may present with hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism and with or without a goiter.

  • Hashimoto's thyroiditis

    serch.it?q=Hashimoto's-thyroiditis

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis, also known as chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis and Hashimoto's disease, is an autoimmune disease in which the thyroid gland is gradually destroyed. Early on there may be no symptoms. Over time the thyroid may enlarge forming a painless goiter. Some people eventually develop hypothyroidism with its accompanying weight gain, feeling tired, constipation, depression, and general pains. After many years the thyroid typically shrinks in size. Potential complications include thyroid lymphoma. Hashimoto's thyroiditis is thought to be due to a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Risk factors include a family history of the condition and having another autoimmune disease. Diagnosis is confirmed with blood tests for TSH, T4, and anti-thyroid autoantibodies. Other conditions that can produce similar symptoms include Graves’ disease and nontoxic nodular goiter. Hashimoto's thyroiditis is typically treated with levothyroxine. If hypothyroidism is not present some may recommend no treatment while others may treat to try to reduce the size of the goiter. Those affected should avoid eating large amounts of iodine; however, sufficient iodine is required especially during pregnancy. Surgery is rarely required to treat the goiter. Hashimoto's thyroiditis affects about 5% of the population at some point in their life. It typically begins between the ages of 30 and 50 and is much more common in women than men. Rates of disease appear to be increasing. It was first described by the Japanese physician Hakaru Hashimoto in 1912. In 1957 it was recognized as an autoimmune disorder.

  • Thyroid disease

    serch.it?q=Thyroid-disease

    Thyroid disease is a medical condition that affects the function of the thyroid gland. The thyroid gland is located at the front of the neck and produces thyroid hormones that travel through the blood to help regulate many other organs, meaning that it is an endocrine organ. These hormones normally act in the body to regulate energy use, infant development, and childhood development. There are five general types of thyroid disease, each with their own symptoms. A person may have one or several different types at the same time. The five groups are: 1) Hypothyroidism (low function) caused by not having enough free thyroid hormones 2) Hyperthyroidism (high function) caused by having too much free thyroid hormones 3) Structural abnormalities, most commonly a goiter (enlargement of the thyroid gland) 4) Tumors which can be benign (not cancerous) or cancerous 5) Abnormal thyroid function tests without any clinical symptoms (subclinical hypothyroidism or subclinical hyperthyroidism). In some types, such as subacute thyroiditis or postpartum thyroiditis, symptoms may go away after a few months and laboratory tests may return to normal.

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