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  • Medical uses of silver

    serch.it?q=Medical-uses-of-silver

    The medical uses of silver include its use in wound dressings, creams, and as an antibiotic coating on medical devices. Wound dressings containing silver sulfadiazine or silver nanomaterials may be used on external infections. There is tentative evidence that silver coatings on endotracheal breathing tubes may reduce the incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia. Silver generally has low toxicity, and minimal risk is expected when silver is used in approved medical applications. Alternative medicine products such as colloidal silver are not safe or effective.

  • List of commonly available chemicals

    serch.it?q=List-of-commonly-available-chemicals

    Many chemicals are commonly available in pure form. Others are available as reagents - inexpensive, convenient sources of chemicals with a bit of processing. This is convenient for both amateur and professional chemistry work. Common reagents include: Metal oxides and carbonates (widely used in pottery) Organic acids (used for home brewing) Solvents and acids (used in cleaning materials and other hardware applications) Photographic chemicals, such as silver nitrate Single-chemical fertilizers, such as potassium nitrate (used in agricultural supply) Chlorinating agents, such as calcium hypochlorite (used in swimming pool and water purification) Mordants, such as potassium dichromate (used in arts and crafts)Details on the constituent chemicals of various household products can be found on the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Household Products Index.

  • Wart

    serch.it?q=Wart

    Warts are typically small, rough, and hard growths that are similar in color to the rest of the skin. They typically do not result in other symptoms, except when on the bottom of the feet where they may be painful. While they usually occur on the hands and feet they can also affect other locations. One or many warts may appear. They are not cancerous. Warts are caused by infection with a type of human papillomavirus (HPV). Factors that increase the risk include use of public showers, working with meat, eczema, and a low immune system. The virus is believed to enter the body through skin that has been damaged slightly. A number of types exist, including common warts, plantar warts, filiform warts, and genital warts. Genital warts are often sexually transmitted. Without treatment, most types of warts resolve in months to years. A number of treatments may speed resolution including salicylic acid applied to the skin and cryotherapy. In those who are otherwise healthy they do not typically result in significant problems. Treatment of genital warts differs from that of other types. Warts are very common, with most people being infected at some point in their lives. The estimated current rate of non-genital warts among the general population is 1–13%. They are more common among young people. Estimated rates of genital warts in sexually active women is 12%. Warts have been described at least as far back as 400 BC by Hippocrates.

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