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  • Suzuki

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    is a Japanese multinational corporation headquartered in Minami-ku, Hamamatsu. Suzuki manufactures automobiles, four-wheel drive vehicles, motorcycles, all-terrain vehicles (ATVs), outboard marine engines, wheelchairs and a variety of other small internal combustion engines. In 2016, Suzuki was the eleventh biggest automaker by production worldwide. Suzuki has over 45,000 employees and has 35 production facilities in 23 countries, and 133 distributors in 192 countries. The worldwide sales volume of automobiles is the world's tenth largest, while domestic sales volume is the third largest in the country. Suzuki’s domestic motorcycle sales volume is the third largest in Japan.

  • Suzuki LT250R

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    The Suzuki LT250R was a sport ATV manufactured between 1985 and 1992. It combined a lightweight frame and good handling, with a liquid cooled 250cc two-stroke engine. Commonly known as the Quadracer, it revolutionized the (ATV industry). Before this model was released, the ATV world was dominated by three-wheelers. Although the four-stroke LT250E Quadrunner was released a year earlier, it was not well accepted by racing enthusiasts that were hesitant to adopt the heavier four-wheelers over their three-wheelers. Then came the LT250R. Most of the advances made by Suzuki with this quad have been overshadowed by the Honda TRX250R, which was released in 1986. During these early years though, they were treated as equals, with the Honda being preferred by most because of its apparent handling characteristics. Even though both model names ended with "250R", the Honda walked away with the nickname. The LT250R setup is what is commonly used in today's sport quads, such as: 2-wheel rear drive with a solid axle "A-Arm" front suspension Powerful lightweight engine Manual transmission and clutch Hydraulic disc brakes, two in front, one for the rear Chain drive

  • Snowmobile

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    A snowmobile tour at Yellowstone National Park. A snowmobile, also known as a motor sled, motor sledge, or snowmachine, is a motorized vehicle designed for winter travel and recreation on snow. It is designed to be operated on snow and ice and does not require a road or trail, but most are driven on open terrain or trails. Snowmobiling is a sport that many people have taken on as a serious hobby. Older snowmobiles could generally accommodate two people; however, most snowmobiles manufactured in the last twenty-five years have been designed for a single rider. Snowmobiles built with the ability to carry two riders are referred to as "2-up" snowmobiles or 'touring' models and make up an extremely small share of the market. Snowmobiles do not have any enclosures, except for a windshield, and their engines normally drive a continuous track at the rear. Skis at the front provide directional control. Early snowmobiles used rubber tracks, but modern snowmobiles' tracks are typically made of a Kevlar composite. Originally, snowmobiles were powered by two-stroke gasoline internal combustion engines and since the mid-2000s four-stroke engines have also entered the market. The second half of the 20th century saw the rise of recreational snowmobiling, whose riders are called snowmobilers or sledders. Recreational riding is known as snowcross/racing, trail riding, freestyle, boondocking, ditchbanging and grass drags. In the summertime snowmobilers can drag race on grass, asphalt strips, or even across water (see Snowmobile skipping). Snowmobiles are sometimes modified to compete in long-distance off-road races.

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